Real-Time Computation and Communication Group

People

People Projects Publications Resources

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Faculty

bulletAzer Bestavros, Ph.D. 1992, Harvard University
Professor Azer Bestavros' research revolves around two main themes, namely that (1) redundancy could be used to boost timeliness of RT systems and networks, and (2) QoS requirements can be guaranteed through statistical characterization and management of system unpredictability. These concepts have been applied to the design of scheduling services for RT operating systems, concurrency controllers and schedulers for RT databases, and protocols for RT unicast and multicast communication.

 

bulletIbrahim Matta, Ph.D. 1995, University of Maryland, College Park
Professor Ibrahim Matta's research focuses on networking protocols and services that enable differentiated QoS. This encompasses research in (1) QoS-constrained unicast and multicast routing, and (2) traffic control mechanisms for dynamic resource allocation in support of network-aware adaptive protocols and applications.

 

bulletRichard West, Ph.D. 2000, Georgia Institute of Technology
Professor Richard West's research revolves around the development of principles, methods, algorithms, and system support for the online adaptation of applications and system components, to address the QoS needs of embedded/real-time, high performance, and interactive applications. 

 

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Current Students

bulletKanishka Gupta
Kanishka Gupta's research is focusing on the development of context-aware scheduling policies. Context awareness implies that the scheduling algorithm is constrained (or optimized) by the "state" of the underlying resources. Context-aware scheduling is important for many emerging real-time applications including those in sensor networks and embedded systems. 

 

bulletYuting Zhang
Yuting Zhang's research is on multi-resource management in real-time (or otherwise QoS-constrained) systems.

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Alumni of the Ph.D. Program

bulletShudong Jin, Ph.D. 2003
Shudong Jin's PhD thesis considered the issue of scalable delivery of real-time streaming media over the Internet. He focused on characterization of Web/streaming media traffic and on Internet topology, streaming media workload generation, and performance evaluation of large-scale streaming delivery techniques.

 

bulletLiang Guo, Ph.D. 2002
Liang Guo's PhD research focuses on developing network mechanisms, including routing and active queue management, to support real-time applications.

 

bulletAlia Atlas, Ph.D. 1999
Alia Atlas's PhD research focuses on scheduling algorithms for periodic tasks with variable resource requirements, firm deadlines, and a statistcal Quality of Service requirement. Towards this end, she and Azer have developed Statistical Rate Monotonic Scheduling. A demonstration applet for this algorithm, with its Quality of Service calculations, can be found here.

 

bulletGitae Kim, Ph.D. 1998
Gitae (Keith) Kim's thesis work was on the tradeoffs between spatial and temporal redundancy in communication systems. In that respect, he introduced a number of protocols for using redundancy to achieve "forward erasure recovery" and to do so in a controllable manner that allows redundancy to be traded off for timeliness. His work on the TCP Boston protocol and the ATM AAL Lazy Packet Discard protocol showed that such an approach is particularly useful to counteract the effects of fragmentation. Keith is currently with Bellcore where he is pursuing research on Internet traffic characterization, among other things.

 

bulletSue Nagy, Ph.D. 1997
Sue Nagy's thesis work was on developing a framework for executing hard real-time transaction systems, whereby each transaction is associated with a recovery block. When a transaction is admitted into the system, it is guaranteed either to commit before its deadline, or else its recovery block is guaranteed to complete before that same deadline. Commiting a transaction results in a positive value-added to the system, whereas completing a recovery block results in no value-added to the system. Sue is conducting comprehensive simulation studies to evaluate various admission, concurrency, and scheduling protocols that aim at maximizing the value-added to the system. Sue is currently with EMC corporation.

 

bulletSpyros Braoudakis, Ph.D. 1994
Spyros Braoudakis' research work focuses on Concurrency Control Protocols for Real-Time Databases. In his Ph.D. Thesis, he investigated several issues related to Speculative Concurrency Control, including a formal proof of correctness, complexity analysis, and heuristics to make speculation practical. Also, he was part of a research team that conducted extensive simulations of various real-time concurrency control protocols---a study that confirmed the superiority of speculative concurrency control. Spyros is now in Greece, serving in its army. Thereafter he is expecting to work for a telecommunication company thereafter.

 

bulletJohn Gibbon, Ph.D. 1994
John Gibbon's Ph.D. Thesis was on Real-Time Scheduling for Multimedia Services Using Network Delay Estimation. He was a member of the Multimedia Communications Lab in the School of Engineering working with Prof. Tom Little. Now, John works for Silicon Graphics.

 

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Alumni of the M.A. Program

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Jaehee Yoon, M.A. 2001
Jaehee Yoon's PhD research focuses on developing and evaluating multicast communication protocols for applications with real-time requirements.

 
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Sonya Rikhtverchik, M.A. 1999
Sonya Rikhtverchik's Undergraduate Work for Distinction and her MA thesis project focused on developing middleware that would allow for the real-time "benchmarking" of Java Virtual Machines for the purpose of gauging design-to-time real-time internet applications.

 

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Adrian Prezioso, M.A. 1999
Adrian Prezioso's Masters project was to implement a SRMS-based admission controller for periodic applications with firm real-time constraints running under a Windows NT Operating System. This admission controllers uses SRMS' schedulability tests to decide if the statistical QoS constraints of a set of applications will be preserved upon admitting a new application. 

 

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Agnes Lee, M.A. 1996
Agnes Lee's Masters project was to build a simulator for broadcast disk systems to be used as a testbed for caching and prefetching protocols for mobile applications with Real-Time and Fault-Tolerance constraints.

 

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Mariya Kishenyuk, M.A. 1996
Mariya Kishenyuk's Masters project was to test and evaluate a number of broadcast disk programming and caching protocols for mobile applications with Real-Time and Fault-Tolerance constraints.

 

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Kyung-Suk Lhee, M.A. 1995
Kyung-Suk Lhee's Masters thesis was to implement a compiler that translates Cleopatra programs into C, while preserving the full semantics of the Time-constrained Reactive Automata Model underlying the design of Cleopatra.

 
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Benjamin Mandler, M.A. 1994
Benjamin mandler completed his Masters thesis in the Summer of 1994. In his thesis project, Benjamin built a testbed for studying and evaluating real-time concurrency control protocols. He led a research team that conducted extensive simulations of various real-time concurrency control protocols---a study that confirmed the superiority of speculative concurrency control. Benjamin is now in Israel, where he works for IBM.

 
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Dimitrios Spartiotis, M.A. 1993
Dimitrios Spartiotis completed his Masters thesis on Probabilistic Job Scheduling for Distributed Real-time Applications. In his thesis, Dimitrios proposed a heuristic for dynamically scheduling time-constrained tasks in a distributed environment. He performed extensive simulations, which confirmed his thesis that keeping a diverse availability profile and using passive bidding (through gossiping) are both advantageous to distributed scheduling for real-time systems. Dimitrios is now with Princeton Transportation Consulting Group.

 
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Mohammad Makarechian, M.A. 1993
Mohammad Makarechian completed his Masters thesis project on building a prototype for real-time communication using AIDA, a bandwidth allocation scheme that allows redundancy to be traded for predictability (by reducing jitter). Now, Mohammad works for HP.

 

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Updated last on September 13, 2004