sen.so.ri.um \sen-'so-r-e--*m, -'so.r-\ \-e--*\ n or sensoriums or sen.so.ria [LL, sense organ, fr. L sensus sense] pl : the parts of the brain concerned with the reception and interpretation of sensory stimuli; broadly : the entire sensory apparatus

Computer Science
Boston University

Sensorium ResearchSensorium Projects Sensorium Applications Sensorium Labs Sensorium Links

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Overview: Recent trends suggest that inexpensive networked video sensing elements will be pervasively deployed in our environment. Already, they are embedded in devices such as computers and mobile phones and they are mounted in public spaces such as malls and airports. In many ways, this trend could prove beneficial to society, in that information collected by sensors could be shared for the better good. Harnessing the power of these emergent sensory environments will hinge on our ability to build applications capable of gathering, interpreting and storing data from distributed sensors and to provide scalable mechanisms for managing the networks and systems resources that these applications consume.

The Sensorium Infrastructure and associated projects in the Computer Science Department at Boston University aim to catalyze fundamental advances in image and video computing, network protocols, and resource management to deal with unique spatio-temporal constraints of sensor networks in general and of video sensor networks in particular. When fully acquired, the Sensorium research infrastructure will be composed of a sensor network of video cameras spanning several rooms, networked processing units, and a terabyte database, managed together to satisfy queries using those generated by mobile users within this environment.

Scope: The Sensorium infrastructure will enable a number of collaborative research projects led by various research groups in the department. Information about these projects is available in a 15-page document describing in some depth the technical challenges and range of problems to be tackled along the dimensions highlighted below.

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The Image and Video Computing Group will lead research on modeling, interpretation, and prediction of human motion in video streams at multiple scales in space/time and at multiple layers of detail.

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The Web and InterNetworking Group will lead research on the development of efficient location management, routing, transport, and content distribution protocols for multi-resolution/scale streaming sensory data networks. Also, it will work on efforts to characterize and model network traffic and access patterns in mobile and wireless (video) sensor networks.

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The Operating Systems and Services Group will lead research on instrumentation of embedded real-time operating systems to enable coordinated resource management, and on the development of middleware services for the management of active and ad-hoc sensor networks.

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The Database Group will investigate issues in the indexing and mining of large spatio-temporal non-textual sensory datasets, with a particular emphasis on mining of human motions and activities.

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The Programming Languages and Systems Group will work on techniques to enhance code safety for embedded systems through the use of type systems and run-time support, with emphasis on flow-oriented programming.

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The Security and Applied Cryptography Group will focus on the development of algorithms for supporting security and trust, and for protecting the confidentiality and integrity of data in video sensor networks and repositories.

Sponsors: The Sensorium Infrastructure is supported partially by a National Science Foundation Research Infrastructure grant entitled Sensorium: Research Infrastructure for Managing Spatio-Temporal Objects in Video Sensor Networks.

 

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(C) Copyright 2003. All rights reserved.
Updated last on September 04, 2005
by Azer Bestavros


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